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Lucy Steele - Modern Devon

Native Speaker Source: 

https://www.dialectsarchive.com/england-35 

Posture

Focus behind nostrils

Prosody 

"Uptalk" - common rising intonation at the ends of sentences

 

Pronunciation

1) PRICE [ɔɪ̆]  "OEE" 

The lips round at the beginning of this diphthong.

1. I like pie.

2. Why, I might try to fly a kite!

 

2) GOAT [aʊ̆]  "AHOOO"

 

The first sound in this diphthong is further forward than in RP. It goes toward the 

[æ] as in "Ash," before the second rounded sound in the diphthong.

1. Oh no, don’t go alone Flo!

2. Be bold, you own the whole old load of gold.​​

 

3) GOOSE [əu] "UHOOO"

The speaker adds a "schwa" or "uh" sound before the vowel.

1. It's true, the goose got loose.

2. There was too much food for you.

4) Labialized 'L'  [ l ]→ [ɛw̚]

For 'L's in the final position, the speaker makes them by rounding her lips as if

she were going to make a 'W' sound, but does not explode it. This can also 

occur when the 'L' is the second to last sound of the word, which caused the 

final sound to be deemphasized.

1. She sold her soul.

2. They'll spend a little time in a cold hospital.

5) Extra Aspiration & Laminal t → t̻ʰ or t̻͡ʃʰ

The 'T' sound gets extra air added to it. It is also made with the blade of the

tongue instead of the tip. The use of the blade instead of the tip is called

"laminal."

5a) 'D' Endings → t̻ʰ or t̻͡ʃʰ

Words ending in 'D' become devoiced and also make the same extra aspirated

and laminal 'T' sound.

1. Two of the trees toppled.

2.  I had to cut a lot of wood in the mud.

The county of Devon is outlined in red

Thomasina - Cockney

The county of Devon is outlined in red

Stanley Holloway as Alfred P. Doolittle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posture

Even furrther foward than RP! Nasality is common.

Prosody 

"Punchy" and "bouncy" rhythm and stress pattern.

 

Pronunciation

VOWEL & DIPHTHONG CHANGES

1) PRICE [ɔɪ̆]  "OEE" 

The lips round at the beginning of this diphthong.

1. I like pie.

2. Why, I might try to fly a kite!

 

2) GOAT [æʊ̆]  "AAAHOOO"

 

The first sound in this diphthong is [æ] as in "Ash," before the second rounded sound in the diphthong.

1. Oh no, don’t go alone Flo!

2. Be bold, you own the whole old load of gold.

 

3) MOUTH [æ] "AAAH" as in "Ash"

This diphthong turns into a monophthong, the vowel [æ] as in "Ash."

1. Get out of the house!

2. I found around a pound.

4) FACE [aɪ̆]  "I" as in the word "I"

This diphthong becomes the diphthong Americans use in the PRICE set, and in the word "I."

1. Make way for the great big cake!

2. The way they say "Hey" is strange.

5) SCHWA-ADDING in GOOSE & FLEECE

 

GOOSE [əu] "UHOOO"  &   FLEECE [əi] "UHEEE" 

The speaker adds a "schwa" or "uh" sound before each of these vowels.

1. It's true, the goose got loose.                   1. We've seen a lot of green trees.

2. There was too much food for you.          2. She feels the need to speak.

CONSONANT CHANGES

1) Labialized 'L'  [ l ]→ [ɛw̚]

For 'L's in the final position, the speaker makes them by rounding her lips as if

she were going to make a 'W' sound, but does not explode it. This can also 

occur when the 'L' is the second to last sound of the word, which caused the 

final sound to be deemphasized.

1. She sold her soul.

2. They'll spend a little time in a cold hospital.

2) Extra Aspiration & Laminal t → t̻ʰ or t̻͡ʃʰ

The 'T' sound gets extra air added to it. It is also made with the blade of the

tongue instead of the tip. The use of the blade instead of the tip is called

"laminal."

2a) 'D' Endings → t̻ʰ or t̻͡ʃʰ

Words ending in 'D' become devoiced and also make the same extra aspirated

and laminal 'T' sound.

1. Two of the trees toppled.

2.  I had to cut a lot of wood in the mud.

3) Dropped 'H'

Speakers will often drop 'H' sounds at the beginning of words.

1. She said how she had changed her name.

2. Have you ever had a hard time?

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